Steiner blessings

March 11, 2008 at 11:44 pm 2 comments

Just got back from another playgroup morning. Munchkin is starting to build up her confidence so much with the surroundings, the other children and the other mums – kisses and hugs for everyone. Its nice to see her seeming a bit more confident.

At morning tea time, when we sit down to eat our buns, the children all hold hands and sing a blessing which goes:

Blessings on the blossoms,

Blessings on the fruit,

Blessings on the leaves and stems

and Blessings on the root.

Spoken: Blessings on this meal”

There is also a line of Maori which may be ‘manahi a kai’ but I can’t be sure. When I work it out I will post it here.

 Its such a lovely way to start a meal. I wonder if I can persuade Hubby to try it at home!

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Entry filed under: Steiner/Waldorf.

Fantasy

2 Comments Add your own

  • 1. henitsirk  |  April 6, 2008 at 1:09 am

    The first time I sang this blessing to my kids, I made up a melody and made the mistake of making it the tiniest bit silly. Now I hardly ever use it because the kids just start laughing, and so I have to recite it instead! But it’s a good one.

    I recently edited a book by the woman who runs Awhina Day Nursery in Havelock North…she incorporates a lot of Maori culture, which I thought was fascinating.

    Reply
  • 2. domesticallyblissed  |  April 6, 2008 at 7:12 am

    That is so cute that your kids started laughing – Hubby just laughs AT me when I sing it. Havelock North is like the Steiner capital of NZ – and such a beautiful place. I must look up Awhina. I love that we ‘NZ-ise’ our Steiner!

    Reply

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